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20121202
20121210
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KQED (PBS) 36
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English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 7:00pm PST
. >> reporter: against that backdrop, the federal reserve is trying to do all it can to help the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenu
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm PST
week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other side is willing to give. then they submit plans they know the other side will reject. and then, only then, a deal is struck. maybe, but not yet. and with every day that passes, congress and the white hous
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 3:00pm PST
than to stay in. won people drop out of the labor force they slow the economy. their productivity is gone, their contributions are no longer there, so this is a different situation we're facing today than we faced i really think since the end of the world war ii. >> brown: before the implication of the fiscal cliff,xplain it because different states have different impact. >> under normal economic times this say program that is governed by state law and administered by the state. and states pay up to 26 weeks of benefits, six months for people who lost jobs through no fault of their own. but if bad economic times historically congress has authorized additional levels of benefits. this time it is a program called the emergency unemployment compensation system. and there are four different tiers depending on how bad your state unemployment rate is every state gets 14 weeks. nine states get up to 47 a decisional weeks. and the rest are in betweenment but you have to be over 9% to get that additional 47 weeks. >> brown: so it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff ne
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 2:30pm PST
that is deprived of its volatility, the system becomes very fragile. just like the economy became fragile by micromanaging. >> let me use that to segue into the text. this book -- define for me "antifragile." >> what is the opposite of fragile? they tend to say robust, solid. the opposite of fragile is something that gains from disorder. i was an options trader for a long time, half of my life. i had a name for things that were harmed by volatility. i realized that you can map fragility as something that gains from volatility. things that gain from volatility, we have to have a name different from resilience. i call them "antifragile." people make mistakes shooting for robustness and stability, things that need -- you go to the gym. people work out. they stress their body and their body gets stronger from stress. it is the same thing with your bones. the same thing applies to economic life. anything organic requires some dose of variability. fixing things is not a good idea. we have departed from the enlightenment of this notion of vieing economic life as something again into thinking tha
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 4:00pm PST
is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1% less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in recession, would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not need that because recovery is fragile. we do not want to have this knock on affect on the fragile recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill as their negotiating? >> i would say focus on the real issue. the real issues for me are the supremacy of the united states and its leadership role in the world. the u.s. has an economic leadership in the world. it is a safe haven. to make sure -- the uncertainty has to be remov
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 7:00pm PST
the markets but there are also fundamentals going on as well. we got mixed reports on the economy. tom just talked about that weak data showing businesses contracting. and we're also getting warnings on weak corporate profits. so doesn't this give you pause about buying in this market right now? >> i think, i just got back from two weeks in europe speaking to portfolio managers in seven different countries. they are profoundly underinvestmented in the u.s. the endowment funds in this country are profoundly underinvested in u.s. equities. a lot of portfolio managers are hoping equities go down as measured by the s&p so their underperformance doesn't look as bad. if the market doesn't go down here i think they will be forced to chase not end of the year. >> susie: uh-huh. beyond stocks, give us your thoughts on bonds, on gold, and other commodities. >> i think gold is in a secular bull market. i think it's just been consolidating the big run it has had and will eventually go higher. bons i think with the re-election of president obama it pretty much insurances you will have low-interest rates
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 7:00pm PST
state's economy? >> well, across the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules are going to be. not just for the next three months, by the way. but really for the next several years. they're more likely to invest, more likely to hire their next employee if they know what the game looks like. what the landscape looks like. and so as much as anything else, we think having that certainty, having that clarity on taxes and spending, is really important. >> susie: you said you are also very concerned about where growth is going to come from. did you discuss that with the president, won did he say, aside from tax increases and spending cuts? >> one of the things we specifically talked about was infrastructure. it didn't used to be that roads and bridges were democrat or republican. we need to cont
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 12:00am PST
economy. >> they could play havoc with the world economy. i think you would see a wave of terror across the region, potentially even here at home. i don't think, just for your personal, as per personal opinion, i don't think they would try to block the persian gulf because that would cut their own throats, but i would not be surprised to see them attack the oil facilities of other countries on the periphery of the gulf. and to do other things that would drive the price of oil through the roof but i think -- and i think you would see them behave in a very different way in both iraq and afghanistan. >> rose: based on everything you know, do you believe that they will respond to the economic embargo, the economic sanctions if we turn that screw as hard as we possibly can? >> i don't think the government will, if there is one thing that the iranians, saddam hussein, the north koreans and bashar al-assad all have in common is they don't care how many other people get killed. >> rose: even their own people? >> it is what happens to them that matters. so the question is, do those, can the sanc
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm PST
important thing we do for national security though, is to get our economy on track. and we are in a very strong position. as i travel around the world, it's fascinating. european leaders, asian leaders, they all say to me, america actually is poorest to be the world leader for another century. if we can fix some of this political dysfunction. and there are some very simple steps that we can take. number one, let's not raise taxes on middle class families. that's something we could do right now. number two, let's have a smart long term deficit reduction program that includes us doing some things right now that would help with job creation. number three let's not manufacture another debt ceiling crises and number four let's make sure that we're making the kind of investments in education and work force development, energy independence, infrastructure and research and development that ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 3:00pm PST
has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: neither side showed signs of budging today as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 7:00pm PST
, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 6:00pm PST
animals that are so important to our economy and for the environment. they depend upon the coral growth and coral reef and if you have that much of a loss it really has a cascading negative impact. >> sreenivasan: florida is no stranger to storms, and healthy reefs buffer up to 90% of the force of incoming waves providing shoreline protection to people and property from storm surge and erosion. then there's the dollars and cents. more than 33,000 jobs in the florida keys alone are supported by ocean recreation and tourism which accounts for 58% of the local economy and an average $2.3 billion a year. >> it is the lifeblood of our economy in the keys. we get millions of visitors a year who spend millions of hours out on the ocean diving and fishing on our coral reefs. >> sreenivasan: amy slates dive resort depends on coral, and the divers who come to see them >> because we deal so much with nature and with diving its it's probably life or death for my business, i hate to say it, but if the coral reefs thrive and grow, the more wildlife you have and the nicer it will be for everyone. and
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 4:00pm PST
and international economies as well. can you reassure them that you will come to some sort of a deal? >> i think that we will. we're in the early stages of the serious negotiations and that president -- the president has put forth an offer and speaker john boehner has put forth that offer. the fact that this is rejected is to be expected but it is testing ground. we have seen that between them have gone through this process. i believe we will get there. both sides so that we cannot win are refusing to compromise. we both have our right to be here and we have countered with some revenue in places. we want to see what the president will do in terms of cuts. where are concerned about the deficit. i believe we will get there. i really do. >> you are a perennial optimist. you make everything seem sunny. we are at a stalemate. republicans do not want to raise taxes and democrats to know what to -- do not want to cut spending. >> the president has the political upper hand. if nothing happens, the tax rates do expire as is and they go up and the sequestration of takes place. he can vote -- publicly blam
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 4:00pm PST
the house of commons from the british economy -- on the british economy, he had to read mcvet is taking much longer than in must got to balance -- he had to admit it is taking much habrÉ than it osborn when o address was first thought to balance the nation's books. >> the people want to know that we are making progress, and the message today is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we are getting there. >> he pointed to the economic problems globally that are making his job harder. as a result, the chancellor announced austerity would have to last for logger, until 2018, in fact. that means more benefits will now be squeezed, and there will be a tax rates on the pension pops. >> i know these tax measures willthought to balance not be r. ways to reduce the deficit never are. but we must act together. when you look for savings, it is fair to local to the 1%. >> with multiple forecasts being downgraded, it has now become an issue about competence. they argue not only has the chancellor failed, but failed on his own terms. >> it has been completely derailed. the one test they set
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 3:00pm PST
.ncicap.org-- >> for the record, the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%, the economy adding 146,000 jobs in november. we want to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is under 20%. why what a the president back down? >> the president isn't interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding a fiscal cliff, and clearly not been tested at all in cutting and spending. >> the senate minority leader says that what the president is interested in is getting as much taxpayer money has he can so that he can spend to his heart's content. with his approval ratings going up and congress' numbers at historic lows and the unemployment rate dropping, why with the president back down? charles? >> to some extent he is under estimating the damage she will suffer if -- he suffer if we go over the cliff.
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 7:30pm PST
of looking at the future of our economy. but some of the other statistics when you look at that is that 55% of latino boys and 54% of african-american boys graduate on time. so you start harkening back to that 70% figure and then doing the math. one-sixth of african-american males between the ages of 16 and 25 are either out of work, out of school, or in jail. >> what are some of the reasons for that? did the study look at that? >> they did. you know, poverty is a big factor. many of these children experience huge amounts and repetitive amounts of trauma. and i can hear the viewers out there. i can hear them yelling into their tv set that it's parenting. right? it's the absent fathers, it's the absent parent in general and that -- those caring environments. but i think what this study is doing is it's really looking at what the reality is. the causes are a problem. poverty, trauma. fixing those is difficult. you have to lower crime, right? you have to get people jobs so that they get out of poverty. but what this report is looking at very specifically is a small subset of our society. youn
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 7:00pm PST
if there is a deal we're talking about an economy that is going to have to deal with people having higher taxes and dealing with spending cuts. what are you projecting for what are you projecting qlu ha, for economic growth and unemployment. >> sure. i think the economy going to be facing some fiscal drag from the federal side but if it is phased in slowly, it's not really use ter and abrupt i think it can handle it because i think the private sector is healing and i'm looking for improvement in growth for the second half of the year provided that we don't hit a landmine here on the fiscal side. >> all right, josh, thanks some of. we've been speaking with josh feinman of db advisor. >> tom: nearly a month and a half after super-storm sandy wreaked havoc along the new jersey shore, president obama met today with governor chris christie at the white house. the topic-- federal aid for storm recovery. the president is expected to ask congress for about $50 billion in additional emergency assistance. ruben ramirez is in seaside heights, new jersey, where business owners are striving to recover. rub
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 3:30pm PST
week of january, the u.s. economy will be hit by $600 billion of automatic tax increases. and automatic spending cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue shou
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement ca
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
neil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the economy added more jobs than expected in november, and the unemployment rate dropped to a four year low. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 3:00pm PST
ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 10:00pm PST
the economy. >> narrator: by 2008, corzine had become a trusted advisor to barack obama. it was once rumored that he might even replace tim geithner as treasury secretary. >> here we go, folks. >> narrator: but then in 2010, new jersey voters ended his political career and returned him to wall street. >> former new jersey governor jon corzine is returning to the private sector. he has taken the helm of mf global. >> narrator: but corzine's choice of mf global was puzzling. >> i think it was a little surprising that he went to such a small firm. you know, if you think about it, goldman partner, goldman ceo, confidante of the president of the united states, former new jersey governor, senator. why wasn't he running a bigger firm, i guess, is the real question. >> 99% of people would look at his résumé and say, "i was a senior partner at goldman sachs, i was the governor of new jersey, i'm past 60, over and out, i'm going to go have fun." but he looks at his résumé and says, "i was kicked out of goldman sachs. i was kicked out of being the governor. i still have something to prove." >> and
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)